Friday, July 29, 2016

Bulletin July 31-August 7, 2016

Sunday of 350 Martyrs
July is the month of the Massabki Martyrs: three brave lay men, who gave their lives in defense of their faith. But more than that, they were businessmen and family men who modeled their faith at home, way before they paid the ultimate price of martyrdom.
When we think of the Massabki Brothers, and all those who have witnessed to Christ and paid the ultimate price, we think how faithful they must have been. But martyrdom is not only about those who have received their crown; it is also about us.  What are we doing to deserve a similar crown? Are we also that “faithful  witness, “ as was Jesus in the Book of Revelations, willing to die, and just as important, willing to live and witness to “Jesus Christ, and him crucified”?
The Holy Father, Pope Francis, calls upon us to be Christ’s witnesses, just as he asked us in this Jubilee Year to be Christ’s mercy. He often reminds us that the integrity of our lives, that is, the “consistency” or “coherence”, as he likes to say, must include all that we say, do , and live, as well as the way we die, as consistent with our faith in Christ.
Just as mercy is consistent with the Gospel of Christ, so too our witness to him must be consistent with our personal lives. We cannot say we believe in Christ, and then live as though Christ matters little in how we spend time, money, or make  choices.
In Greek the word “martyr” means nothing more than “witness”. A martyr who dies for his/her faith is the same as the faithful witness who lives his/her faith. We are truly Christ’s witnesses, as were the early martyrs, the Massabki Brothers of 1860, and the martyrs of     today, when we live the grace and witness to Christ well. May we then receive the crown He wore.

+Bishop Gregory J. Mansour
Eparchy of Saint Maron of Brooklyn
Maronite Voice July-August 2016

The Eparchy of St. Maron is Celebrating 50 years 1966-2016
Please join Bishop Gregory Mansour and the entire community at a celebration of the  50th Anniversary of the presence of a Maronite Bishop in the United States. The event is Friday  October 7, 2016.  Liturgy will   begin at 6pm at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Lebanon followed by a banquet at 8pm at New York Marriot at Brooklyn Bridge. For more information please visit www.stmaron.org

 MYO Bake Sale
The MYO will be hosting coffee hour on Sunday August 14th and will also be having a bake sale. All are invited to join coffee hour and support the bake sale for the MYO. The MYO is open to the youth of our parish ages 12-18. It is a great way to get involved with your parish and meet other youth your age.


 Sub-Deacon’s Corner
Chorbishop Beggiani’s book, “Early Syraic Theology” discussed a number early theological views written by St. Ephrem (307 – 363AD), Jacob of Serugh (451 – 521AD) and Araphate (280-345AD).  These men traveled throughout the ancient world from Mesopotamia to Judea and into Northern Syria. Many of their writings, homilies and letters become the basis of the Catholic doctrine on worship, their ideas had a great  influence on many of the Eastern Rite Churches, including the Maronite Rite Church.
One concept discussed in “Early Syraic Theology” is Divinization; this concept discusses God’s    intention for Adam and the effect that the Original Sin had upon the plan that God had for all.
From St. Ephrem’ s writings
Firstly to understand that man, Adam, was created in the image of God, and his son Jesus Christ.  For if Adam was created in the image of our savior then Adam had the opportunity to share in his kingdom as well.  Syriac anthropology arrives at the conclusion that humans are not only the summit of creation, but also the bond   uniting the heavens and the earth.  The body of Adam was formed of dust from the earth in its virginal state to become a true microcosm.  In fact, Ephrem sees in the manner of Adam’s creation and in his creation a type of conception of Christ, the New Adam and reconciler of the world, born in the virginal womb of Mary.1 Being in the image of God who has the power over all things high and low, Adam also has power over all creation.2
For Ephrem the key phrase in Genesis, “Let us make Man in our image, after our likeness,” is a fundamental affirmation that the Word of God (Christ) is in the image of God and that God’s relationship with humans is realized by the mediation of the Word.  While Christ as the Word is the image of the Father, he is also the   perfect figure of man.  Humanity finds its perfect realization in Christ.3  This reveals that early Syriac Theology saw Christ as the perfect human, which was what Adam could have been a version of, but through the Original Sin his image was stained and that only through Christ can the creatures(humans) attempt to achieve what God had planned and expects for us.

If you have questions about Catholic teaching or our Maronite tradition, or would like to suggest a topic, please email us or tell us the next time we see you. Thank you and God Bless.
David Wahby (wahby@sbcglobal.net) and Tony Simon (asimon@simonlawpc.com)

Kitchen Scoop
Monday August 1st- Tabouli
Tuesday Making Kibbi Aras 8 am
Rolling Grape Leaves Schedule:
Sunday July 31st, Sunday August 7th, Sunday August 21st, Sunday August 28th, and Sunday September 11th.  Also, Thursday August 4th at 9 am and Thursday August 18th from 4pm-7pm (before the festival meeting). We are six weeks away from the festival and all help is greatly appreciated.
A big Thank You to All the kitchen volunteers who work throughout the week . We have had an amazing month in July and it takes a lot of hard work to make the Wednesday lunch happen. A special thanks to all who work so hard to make Wednesday lunch a  success.


Parish Finances July 24th-July 31st
Collections
Saturday  July 23rd Liturgy: $656.00
Sunday July 24th Liturgy: $1,911.00
Revenue during the week: $784.00
Maintenance and Repair: $299.00 (Counted in Sat and Sun totals)
Peter’s Pence: $50 (Counted in Sat and Sun totals)
Candles: $55.00
Coffee Hour: $131.00
Income:$3,537.00
Expenses: $5,074.19


















Friday, July 22, 2016

Bulletin July 24th-31st


Visit of Jesus to Zacchaeus’ House

The message begins with an account of how Zacchaeus went out on a limb to see Jesus. The Gospel reading is, of course, for all Christians and carries with it many important points for our reflection.

Zacchaeus was the chief tax collector. Predictably, he was a wealthy man because he received a percentage of what he collected. It is a striking scene when the Lord spots Zacchaeus, singles him out and calls out loud that he will come to Zacchaeus’s house that very day. For Zacchaeus, it was instant fame and rehabilitation. By this gesture, Jesus recognized Zacchaeus’ inherent dignity as a human being and his spiritual potential. The Lord did not judge by labels and instead affirms Zacchaeus’ dignity in front of the crowd.

In this scene we see a concrete example of the grand truth from the book of Wisdom that God does not desire the death of sinners but maintains our life to give us an opportunity to discover Him and find forgiveness and new life. There is nobody too small for Jesus to notice. In the eyes of Christ we all count.

A second point of this story is that Zacchaeus climbed the tree to see Jesus out of curiosity. People make their initial contact with the church not necessarily for theological reasons. Some are drawn to the church’s history, architecture, music, and art. They are curious about the Catholic instinct that the church is a reality greater than her individual members.

Many things, even curiosity, can bring people into the zone of Christ’s presence. Once there, Jesus can touch the heart and soul of that person. Buried within curiosity and fascination with the church may be a seed of faith waiting to come to life . St. Augustine pointed out from his own life that searching, critique and curiosity can be a disguised question for God. Christ can bring to fulfillment every effort of faith.

Finally, when Jesus comes to Zacchaeus ’ home, He does not condemn wealth. He does not give a parable about judgment.  His presence and His respect for Zacchaeus pledges to correct several times over any wrong he may have done in the past. Suddenly, a new disciple is born and a soul is saved.

Perhaps this scene can teach us that evangelization can take many forms. Confrontation, debate, argument and correction can have their place.

There is also the role of Christian friendship; when a person can see the Gospel lived and activated in a person’s relationship.

The story of Zacchaeus carries valuable lessons for us all. The first is that we all count in God’s sight Secondly, Jesus can use a person’s attraction to any aspect of the church’s life to begin to touch that  soul. Finally, we should never underestimate the power of Christian friendship to be an instrument of Christ’s grace to others.

Love for another is showed not only in the heroics of self-sacrifice. It is also showed in the courtesy, respect and civility we show them. These can be highways of Christ’s grace to them.




We received the sad news that Bishop Elias Zaidan’s mother, Yvette  Zaidan, has passed away in Lebanon on Sunday July 17th. The funeral was Wednesday July 20th at Our Lady of Deliverance church in Lebanon. May God grant her   eternal rest and peace. May He bestow the blessings of comfort and consolation upon Bishop Zaidan and the rest of the family.



Sub-Deacon’s Corner
A group of visitors from a nearby Roman Catholic parish ask you about the difference between the Maronite Church and the Roman Catholic Church. Here is some information that you can use to answer the inquiry.
The Antiochian Tradition of the Maronite liturgy is made up of pieces of both Syriac and Greek traditions that existed in the area from which it was born. As mentioned above Maronites have a strong belief that, “All is connected to God and God is connected to all” inferring that all things come from God.  This is greatly exhibited in the Maronite Liturgy.  The Latin and Maronite Liturgy are similar in some ways, but the Maronite Liturgy places a greater emphasis on the  celebration coming from the Altar, and more so symbolically from God.  As the Latin ceremony asks for all to give each other the sign of peace; in the Maronite Liturgy the greeting of peace emanates from the Altar through the hands of the Priest, which are considered blessed and subsequently all things that they touch are blessed, to the servers and onto the congregation.  This simple coordinated act reminds Maronites that, “all is connected to God and God is connected to all”
Easily noticed differences are the employment of intinction when receiving communion.  The Communicant never touches the body and blood of Christ except with their tongue to ingest.  Also, the Maronite rite holds a close kinship to the Syriac Antiochene traditions which to a great extent embodies the traditions of the, “Mother of all Churches”, the Church of Jerusalem. This becomes obvious once you have heard the consecration in the language widely used at the time of the last supper; Aramaic(Syriac).  This ties the Maronite rite to that which came before and back to the  beginning.
If you have questions about Catholic teaching or our Maronite tradition, or would like to suggest a topic, please email us or tell us the next time we see you. Thank you and God Bless.
David Wahby (wahby@sbcglobal.net) and Tony Simon (asimon@simonlawpc.com)

The Eparchy of St. Maron is Celebrating 50 years 1966-2016
Please join Bishop Gregory Mansour and the entire community at a celebration of the  50th Anniversary of the presence of a Maronite Bishop in the United States. The event is Friday  October 7, 2016.  Liturgy will   begin at 6pm at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Lebanon followed by a banquet at 8pm at New York Marriot at Brooklyn Bridge. For more information please visit www.stmaron.org

2016 Festival
The next festival meeting will be Thursday July 28th at 7pm in the Lebanon room. The festival is a parish event and St. Raymond’s only fundraiser to help support the complex for the year. Many hands do make the work load lighter and it takes a lot of time and preparation for this event.
Countdown to Festival-8 weeks
Let’s show a strong parish effort to make this event a success!



Kitchen Scoop
Rolling Cabbage Rolls Mondays @ 8am
Making Kibbi Aras Tuesdays @ 8am
The festival is eight weeks away and the kitchen is in need of help to prepare for the festival and Wednesday lunches. Any time you can give would be very helpful! Please look for the Kitchen   schedule in the bulletin or by email. If you would like to be on the email list please contact Denise Seifert, Kathleen Wahby, or Gina Fanetti.  Thank  you!

 
IDC Meeting
The next IDC (In Defense of Christians) meeting will be held on Wednesday July 27th at 7pm. The meeting will be held at  St. Michael’s the Archangel Orthodox Church.
The church is  located on 1901 Ann Ave St. Louis, MO. 63104.  Everyone is welcome to attend!


MYO Bake Sale
The MYO will be hosting coffee hour on Sunday August 14th and will also be having a bake sale. All are invited to join  coffee hour and support the bake sale for the MYO. The MYO is open to the youth of our parish ages 12-18. It is a great way to get involved with your parish and meet other youth your age.

Parish Finances July 17th-July 24th
Collections
Saturday  July 16th Liturgy: $797.00
Sunday July 17th Liturgy: $833.00
Revenue during the week: $225.00
Candles: $73.00
Coffee Hour: $67.00

Income:$1,995.00
Expenses: $4, 941.85
















Friday, July 15, 2016

Bulletin July 17-24,2016

Message about the Life and Miracles of St. Sharbel Makhlouf

Youssef Antoun Makhlouf was born on May 8, 1828 in Bkaakafra, North Lebanon. His parents were poor but religious, and their fifth child was attracted at an early age to prayer and solitude. In spite of the opposition of his family, he left home at the age of twenty-three and entered the Monastery of St. Maron at a place called Annaya where he chose his new name Sharbel, one of the martyrs of the second century in the Antioch Church. On the first of November 1853, He revealed his monastic vows in the same monastery. He was then well informed of the precise obligations of these vows: Obedience, chastity and poverty.
He continued his theological studies in the Monastery of Kfifan, under the care of his teacher the Saint Nemtallah Kassab Hardini , who was the ideal for the monks and a living image of the great sanctified Monks in his private and public life.
On July 23, 1859, Brother Sharbel Makhlouf was ordained a priest in Bkerke.
Father Sharbel lived in the Monastery of St. Maron, Annaya for a period of sixteen years. He was obedient to his superiors, sticking to his monkhood law precisely. He was ruthless on himself by living strict austerity and mortification. He denounced all worldly materials in the earthly life, to go serve His Lord and the salvation of his soul. During the year 1875 God inspired Father Sharbel to live as a hermit. He spent 23 years in the       hermitage where he spent most of his time before the Eucharist in prayer. On December 16, 1898, while celebrating the Holy mass, Father Sharbel was struck by a stroke and died eight days later on Christmas eve. He was seventy years old.
On October 9th, 1977, just twelve years after his beatification, Pope Paul VI presided over the canonization proceedings and announced to the world that Blessed Sharbel had joined the ranks of saints in Heaven.
St. Sharbel miracles surpassed the boarders of Lebanon. Up to this day, thousands of miracles have been   reported to the Monastery of Annaya, Lebanon.
St. Sharbel, Pray for us!



 IDC Meeting
The next IDC (In Defense of Christians) meeting will be held on Wednesday July 27th at 7pm. The meeting will be held at St. Michael’s the Archangel Orthodox Church. They are located on 1901 Ann Ave
St. Louis, MO 63104

2016 Festival
The next festival meeting will be Thursday July 28th at 7pm in the Lebanon room. The festival is a parish event and St. Raymond’s only fundraiser to help support the complex for the year. Many hands do make the work load lighter and it takes a lot of time and preparation for this event.  More help would be greatly       appreciated even if it’s only a few hours of your time.
Let’s show a strong parish effort to make this event a success!

 Sub-Deacon’s Corner

A group of visitors from a nearby Roman Catholic parish ask you about the difference between the Maronite Church and the Roman Catholic Church. Here is some information that you can use to answer the inquiry.


The Maronite Service of the Word (the first part of the Liturgy) has two readings.  The Epistle is always a reading from the Letters of Paul or one of the Apostles, followed by the Gospel.  There are only two readings in the Maronite Liturgy, opposed to three in the Roman Rite.  The Maronite Liturgy places a greater focus on the New Testament and events and writings that were a result of Christ becoming man.
The Liturgy differs in the approach; the Maronite Liturgy, the “Quorbono: The Divine Service of the Holy   Mysteries”, with the most sacred portion of the Liturgy being the Anaphora.  The Anaphora is similar to the Latin Rite “Eucharistic Prayer”; however each is different in their own right.  An Anaphora is divided into    sections:

1. The Rite of Peace                                                                  5. Lord’ s Prayer and Penitential Rites
2. The Eucharistic Prayer (which contains the Consecration)   6. Invitation          
3.   Intercessions                                                                        7. Communion
4.   Fractioning, Signing, Sprinkling, Mingling, and Elevation

Missing from the Maronite Quorbono is the preparation of the gifts.  Whereas during the Roman Liturgy the gifts are prepared on the Altar as part of the Liturgy; the Maronite liturgy has the gifts prepared prior to the beginning of the Liturgy and are rather transferred or presented prior to the beginning of the Anaphora. This tradition goes back generations when the gifts were brought to the liturgy by members of the congregation as an offering to God.  As the gifts were a result of the members best effort and labors; it was and honor and privilege to be chosen to make and present the gifts for the Holy Mysteries.

If you have questions about Catholic teaching or our Maronite tradition, or would like to suggest a topic, please email us or tell us the next time we see you. Thank you and God Bless.
David Wahby (wahby@sbcglobal.net) and Tony Simon (asimon@simonlawpc.com)


 The Eparchy of St. Maron is Celebrating 50 years 1966-2016
Please join Bishop Gregory Mansour and the entire community at a celebration of the  50th Anniversary of the presence of a Maronite Bishop in the United States. The event is Friday  October 7, 2016.  Liturgy will   begin at 6pm at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Lebanon followed by a banquet at 8pm at New York Marriot at Brooklyn Bridge. For more information please visit www.stmaron.org

Moving MOM & DAD Seminar

The Daughters of St. Paul present this FREE Educational Seminar to help you gain insight into what you need to help “Right Size” any living situation. A variety of featured speakers/experts will share and answer questions. The seminar is Sat., July 30 from 10:00-11:30A.M. at the Grant’s View Branch of the STL County Library, Room #1, at 9700 Musick Ave., across from Grant’s Farm. Advance reservations to 314-337-1534 by July 27 are appreciated. Friends, Neighbors, Parents, Family Members - - -- - - ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND!


Kitchen Scoop
Rolling Cabbage Rolls Mondays @ 8am
Making Kibbi Aras Tuesdays @ 8am
Rolling Grape Leaves Tuesday July 19th at 4:30pm.
The festival is eight weeks away and the kitchen is in need of help to prepare for the festival and Wednesday lunches. Any time you can give would be very helpful! Please look for the Kitchen schedule in the bulletin or by email. If you would like to be on the list for email please contact Denise Seifert, Kathleen Wahby, or Gina Fanetti.  Thank  you!
  













Friday, June 24, 2016

Bulletin June 26-July 15, 2016

SOLEMNITY OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL
Today we honor Saints Peter and Paul, two great apostles and two great heroes of our faith. We know, however, that they were very human heroes. Their limitations are spelled out for us in the Scriptures. We all know Peter’s shortcomings from the Gospels. We know Paul’s limitations from his own letters. That very human dimension of their personalities makes them very attractive models for us. It is very hard for us to identify with saints who are portrayed as perfect. We can all recognize something of Peter and Paul in ourselves.
Our Gospel reading recounts Peter’s great profession of faith and the special office that Jesus gives him to be the rock or center of the Church. It becomes clear that something much larger than a personal commission to Peter is being enacted. Since Peter will eventually be put to death, the Lord is speaking of His Church for all time. Jesus is establishing an office that will endure beyond Peter and whose purpose is to affirm and be the touchstone of the apostolic faith. This moment is important because it shows that the place of Peter and his successors in the Church was not a position that they assumed on their own but one they were given by the Lord.
If Peter was to be the rock of apostolic faith, Paul was to be the great missionary who would bring that faith to the world he knew. Paul seemed to have had a “roving commission” to establish churches throughout the Mediterranean and he gave expression to the apostolic faith in categories and words that non-Jewish people could understand. In the letters to the Colossians and Ephesians we see Peter’s confession of faith expressed in a way that  people in a non-Palestinian culture could understand.
St. Paul represents the local bishops who must bring the Gospel to people of different cultures and deal with problems and challenges that are very individual. The Church lives by the interaction between Peter who represents our roots and Paul who manifests our reach. Peter stands for our unity and Paul for our universality. The last century has seen emphasis  on our universality or catholicity.
How universal are we? To be a universal Church is, on the one hand, to bring the Gospel to the ends of the earth. The missionary work of the Church is never over. The Church is not a European phenomenon but was created by Christ to fill the world. Every place on earth is a place that the Church can call home. Every culture adds a new and gracious branch to the growing tree of the Church. No two branches are identical yet they all draw life from the same roots and are part of the same tree.
The question of the universality of the Church, on the other hand, is about much more than the geographical spread of the Church. It raises the question of how inclusive we are. Can the Church be home for people who are poor, unconventional, inquiring, intellectual, divorced, criminals or weak of faith? Is the church only for people “like us” or is the Church called to be a model of the Kingdom that will gather all people within her? In a divided world, the Church can be a vivid sign of God’s universal salvation, the mystery that St. Paul remarked was hidden to Israel and only made known in Jesus Christ. We need Peter and we need Paul.

 IDC Meeting
The next IDC (In Defense of Christians) meeting will be held on Wednesday July 27th at 7pm. The location of the meeting will be announced in the next bulletin.

 Coffee Hour
There will be no coffee hour on Sunday July 3rd due to the Holiday weekend. Coffee hour will resume after 10 am liturgy on Sunday July 10th.


2016 Festival
The next festival meeting will be Thursday July 28th at 7pm in the Lebanon room. The festival is a parish event and St. Raymond’s only fundraiser to help support the complex for the year. Many hands do make the work load lighter and it takes a lot of time and preparation for this event.  More help would be greatly appreciated even if it’s only a few hours of your time.

Let’s show a strong parish effort to make this event a success!


 Sub-Deacon’s Corner

A group of visitors from a nearby Roman Catholic parish ask you about the difference between the Maronite Church and the Roman Catholic Church. Here is some information that you can use to answer the inquiry.


The Maronite Rite firstly observe the authority of the Maronite Patriarch assuming the station between the Pope and the Maronite clergy.  Traditionally the Maronite Rite has been in union with the Apostolic Roman See as one of the churches established by Saint Peter ministries.  Once the Church of Jerusalem fell in 70 AD, the Church of Antioch, from whence St. Maron (Maronites are “those of St. Maron”) began his teachings, became the mother of the Catholic Church.  Similarly as the Church of Rome, the Church of Antioch were began by St. Peter. Maronites observe and follow most of the rules from Vatican I and II. Although the Maronite Church observes the Holy See in Rome, the liturgical calendar and celebrations are very different.
First Liturgical calendar  of the Maronite Rite is broken into six seasons:
1. The season of Glorious Epiphany                                                                             
2. The season of Great Lent                                                                
3. The  season of Glorious Resurrection
4. The season of Glorious Pentecost
5. The season of the Holy Cross                 
 6. The season of the Glorious Birth of Our Lord                           

The Latin Rite celebrates the liturgical year into six seasons:
1. Epiphany                                    3. Easter                                              5. Advent
2. Lent                                             4. Pentecost                                        6. Christmas

The Maronite liturgical calendar does not have the season of Advent as we look differently at preparing for the arrival of our Lord. The Maronite Rite considers Lent a journey of hope as we  await the resurrection. As well the Maronite Lent begins with Ash Monday, not Ash Wednesday.

If you have questions about Catholic teaching or our Maronite tradition, or would like to suggest a topic, please email us or tell us the next time we see you. Thank you and God Bless.
David Wahby (wahby@sbcglobal.net) and Tony Simon (asimon@simonlawpc.com)


Kitchen Scoop
The Kitchen will be CLOSED the week of the Fourth of July.
Rolling Cabbage Rolls Mondays @ 8am
Making Kibbi Aras Tuesdays @ 8am
Rolling Grape Leaves Tuesday July 5th at 9 am  and  Tuesday July 19th at 4:30pm.
We are in need of kitchen help because we are not only preparing for Wednesdays, but also beginning to prepare for the festival.
The kitchen is one of the main attractions to the festival and any amount of time you can volunteer will be greatly appreciated.

















Bulletin June 26-July 15, 2016

SOLEMNITY OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL
Today we honor Saints Peter and Paul, two great apostles and two great heroes of our faith. We know, however, that they were very human heroes. Their limitations are spelled out for us in the Scriptures. We all know Peter’s shortcomings from the Gospels. We know Paul’s limitations from his own letters. That very human dimension of their personalities makes them very attractive models for us. It is very hard for us to identify with saints who are portrayed as perfect. We can all recognize something of Peter and Paul in ourselves.
Our Gospel reading recounts Peter’s great profession of faith and the special office that Jesus gives him to be the rock or center of the Church. It becomes clear that something much larger than a personal commission to Peter is being enacted. Since Peter will eventually be put to death, the Lord is speaking of His Church for all time. Jesus is establishing an office that will endure beyond Peter and whose purpose is to affirm and be the touchstone of the apostolic faith. This moment is important because it shows that the place of Peter and his successors in the Church was not a position that they assumed on their own but one they were given by the Lord.
If Peter was to be the rock of apostolic faith, Paul was to be the great missionary who would bring that faith to the world he knew. Paul seemed to have had a “roving commission” to establish churches throughout the Mediterranean and he gave expression to the apostolic faith in categories and words that non-Jewish people could understand. In the letters to the Colossians and Ephesians we see Peter’s confession of faith expressed in a way that  people in a non-Palestinian culture could understand.
St. Paul represents the local bishops who must bring the Gospel to people of different cultures and deal with problems and challenges that are very individual. The Church lives by the interaction between Peter who represents our roots and Paul who manifests our reach. Peter stands for our unity and Paul for our universality. The last century has seen emphasis  on our universality or catholicity.
How universal are we? To be a universal Church is, on the one hand, to bring the Gospel to the ends of the earth. The missionary work of the Church is never over. The Church is not a European phenomenon but was created by Christ to fill the world. Every place on earth is a place that the Church can call home. Every culture adds a new and gracious branch to the growing tree of the Church. No two branches are identical yet they all draw life from the same roots and are part of the same tree.
The question of the universality of the Church, on the other hand, is about much more than the geographical spread of the Church. It raises the question of how inclusive we are. Can the Church be home for people who are poor, unconventional, inquiring, intellectual, divorced, criminals or weak of faith? Is the church only for people “like us” or is the Church called to be a model of the Kingdom that will gather all people within her? In a divided world, the Church can be a vivid sign of God’s universal salvation, the mystery that St. Paul remarked was hidden to Israel and only made known in Jesus Christ. We need Peter and we need Paul.

 IDC Meeting
The next IDC (In Defense of Christians) meeting will be held on Wednesday July 27th at 7pm. The location of the meeting will be announced in the next bulletin.

 Coffee Hour
There will be no coffee hour on Sunday July 3rd due to the Holiday weekend. Coffee hour will resume after 10 am liturgy on Sunday July 10th.


2016 Festival
The next festival meeting will be Thursday July 28th at 7pm in the Lebanon room. The festival is a parish event and St. Raymond’s only fundraiser to help support the complex for the year. Many hands do make the work load lighter and it takes a lot of time and preparation for this event.  More help would be greatly appreciated even if it’s only a few hours of your time.

Let’s show a strong parish effort to make this event a success!


 Sub-Deacon’s Corner

A group of visitors from a nearby Roman Catholic parish ask you about the difference between the Maronite Church and the Roman Catholic Church. Here is some information that you can use to answer the inquiry.


The Maronite Rite firstly observe the authority of the Maronite Patriarch assuming the station between the Pope and the Maronite clergy.  Traditionally the Maronite Rite has been in union with the Apostolic Roman See as one of the churches established by Saint Peter ministries.  Once the Church of Jerusalem fell in 70 AD, the Church of Antioch, from whence St. Maron (Maronites are “those of St. Maron”) began his teachings, became the mother of the Catholic Church.  Similarly as the Church of Rome, the Church of Antioch were began by St. Peter. Maronites observe and follow most of the rules from Vatican I and II. Although the Maronite Church observes the Holy See in Rome, the liturgical calendar and celebrations are very different.
First Liturgical calendar  of the Maronite Rite is broken into six seasons:
1. The season of Glorious Epiphany                                                                             
2. The season of Great Lent                                                                
3. The  season of Glorious Resurrection
4. The season of Glorious Pentecost
5. The season of the Holy Cross                 
 6. The season of the Glorious Birth of Our Lord                           

The Latin Rite celebrates the liturgical year into six seasons:
1. Epiphany                                    3. Easter                                              5. Advent
2. Lent                                             4. Pentecost                                        6. Christmas

The Maronite liturgical calendar does not have the season of Advent as we look differently at preparing for the arrival of our Lord. The Maronite Rite considers Lent a journey of hope as we  await the resurrection. As well the Maronite Lent begins with Ash Monday, not Ash Wednesday.

If you have questions about Catholic teaching or our Maronite tradition, or would like to suggest a topic, please email us or tell us the next time we see you. Thank you and God Bless.
David Wahby (wahby@sbcglobal.net) and Tony Simon (asimon@simonlawpc.com)


Kitchen Scoop
The Kitchen will be CLOSED the week of the Fourth of July.
Rolling Cabbage Rolls Mondays @ 8am
Making Kibbi Aras Tuesdays @ 8am
Rolling Grape Leaves Tuesday July 5th at 9 am  and  Tuesday July 19th at 4:30pm.
We are in need of kitchen help because we are not only preparing for Wednesdays, but also beginning to prepare for the festival.
The kitchen is one of the main attractions to the festival and any amount of time you can volunteer will be greatly appreciated.